50 Ways to Leave Your Filter

It’s some 44 years since Paul Simon’s “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” was composed.

Released in December 1975, it only took a few weeks to become a hit in ´76.

It has endured as a classic song marking the end of a significant relationship.

The drum intro alone has been much sampled and the song interpreted by many acts in homage to the songwriter.

It’s some 44 days, or thereabouts, since Arno Partissimo released the What Disney? are you Instagram filter that has since kicked off a craze.

It’s been much copied, and rehashed by many since, with little regard to the originator.

Whilst imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, it’s a welcome change to at least see things remixed a little, yes?

If you’re wondering how, perhaps the problem is all inside your head.

Because there must be fifty ways to remix, to improve, to create filters that engage an audience.

The answer is easy if you take it logically.

The what sort of... randomiser filters succeed, in part, because of their simplicity.

They invite a momentary lapse of reason for everyone, to escape from reality.

They appeal to being free. 

I'd like to help you in your struggle to be free.

To consider fifty ways to finesse your filter.

Be visual

The language of filters is predominantly visual.

You don't need to discuss much.

Your filter doesn’t need text to thrive.

Infact, if your filter contains excessive text, you’re likely to be denied publishing approval from Instagram.

Make a new plan.


Think audio

Filters need not be silent.

You don't need to be coy.

Include ambient audio in your filter or facially triggered audio fx.

Just listen.


Rear is here

It's not all self.

Rear camera face filters don't have to be identical to selfie filters.

Filters on rear camera allow detection of objects, placement of augmented ones.

Mix it up.

Just slip out the back.


Delight more

Everyone likes a surprise.

An Easter egg perhaps?

A raise of eyebrows, a tilt of the head, a pucker up.

To make you smile again.

Unlock to play

A Russian Doll reveals more within it.

Reward filter behaviour with more filters.

Maybe a time sensitive coupon code?

Just drop off the key, in backchannels.

And get yourself free.


Filters offer creative freedom in abundance

Form yours or hire a filter fanatical team to finesse further

It's really not my habit to intrude

I hope my meaning won't be lost or misconstrued

But I'll repeat myself at the risk of being crude

There must be fifty ways to leave your filter.



Press the Stop Brexit button

An awful lot has happened since I last blogged.

A lot that has happened since I last blogged has been awful.

Those assertions could of course be true for many and the few.

Since starting up Everywoah, the vision has remained to evoke a feeling, to elicit a woah, through augmented and virtual reality.

Communicating feelings that transform into positive actions is the goal that follows from a woah.

There is an innate series of reactions that people experience when they interact with augmented reality and exude a woah.

No matter how short lived the moment, the pure fantasy, and escapism that accompanies that momentary lapse of reason of a woah is a joy to behold.

From joy and woah comes action.

Realities are questioned.

Assertions are challenged.

What if it wasn't virtual?

What if the augmented were mixed?

What if we didn't have to mix our reality?

The clock is ticking.

The UK Parliament is revolting.

People are entitled to a final say 🗳️

Press the 🛑 Stop Brexit button.

Press it on Facebook

Press it on Instagram

Record a video.

Tell the world.

Made for Best For Britain by TFUK supporters with ❤️ at Everywoah.

The Black Swan Referendum

So last week, I had a moment where I thought out aloud.

I tweeted this:

I didn't dwell any further to explain in detail what I was really thinking, until I was asked.

In the increasingly toxic atmosphere of the discussion around the UK European Referendum vote, a day before the heinous murder of Jo Cox, MP, I was referring to a Black Swan.
As I told Becky, who I met a few weeks ago at The Inbounder event in Valencia, I was referring to the phenomenon as explained by the author, former trader, and essayist of probability Nicholas Taleb, that rare events that have a significant impact, appear predictable in hindsight, as opposed to in foresight. I trust that not only does the UK vote to remain in the European Union on Thursday 23rd June, but that the sentiment of #moreincommon prevails here on in.

..we are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us' - Jo Cox, MP

Vive la réalité virtuelle!

We owe it to the French.

When I retorted with this tweet to the statement about Morton Heilig's Sensorama:

I was referring to Antonine Artaud (1896-1948), a french theatre director, widely recognised as one of the major figures of twentieth-century theatre and the European avant-garde.

The Arrival

Be it the early works of Auguste and Louis Lumière and the The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station,

   

to the fabulous efforts of Damien and David to persuade Larry of the delightful viability of Cardboard, that post-modern day plastic, VR aka, réalité virtuelle bleeds tricolore more than anything.

Live VR video

And if we're talking about the continuation of the #avralance then note how those leading the field for many years now, and about to step into big Facebook and Google pursued limelight, is Video Stitch, the company behind the newly launched Orah, a 4k Live streaming camera for prosumer usage that streams to your HMD and your soon your social feed.

Yes, Orah is lead by the French Nicolas Burtey and a team of Parisians. (Ed. seriously thinking of getting one of these!)

And yet in some ways, that narrative of film making in VR is still very much in it's infancy, in a sort of Lumière moment, as story tellers grapple with how to craft a story with new fandangled  tools.

Ghosts and Characters

I recommend digesting Devon Dolan's VR thesis around the The Four Different Types of Stories in VR as modified by Kent Bye. It's a fascinating take on the art.

This piece (in Spanish) from one of the VR creator's of Ministerio del Tiempo for RTVE, goes into more detail about the film and post production techniques in VR to achieve viewer immersion. The notion of cuts and edits is an eternal one in VR that is touched upon:

To change from scene to scene, there's always some elements that allow a transition, an envelope is handed to you, and you have to deliver it to someone...

Para cambiar de escena a escena, siempre hay unos elementos que hacen de transición; te dan un sobre, se lo tienes que entregar (a alguien)

Master story tellers

And yet, those very same story telling techniques and film hacks, that are now flexing a new generation of VR maker's minds, are not too disimilar to the ones that tested yesterday's great directors:

How Alfred Hitchcock hid 10 Edits in ROPE from Vashi Nedomansky.

ROPE (1948) is Alfred Hitchcock's murder/suspense film that showcases the killing in its second shot. ROPE is often described as the film with no edits or cuts.

On further examination...Hitchcock's gem actually contains 10 edits. Five of them are hidden as the camera lens is filled by foreground objects. The other five edits are regular hard cuts that not many people either realize or acknowledge. I've isolated all 10 edits in the video below so you can learn from the Master of Suspense on how to hide your edits without losing momentum in your story.

Vive la revrolution!

Good day, good people

Sometimes you discover, quite by chance, that touching piece of writing or video, that no one else seemingly has.

And it comes at just the right time, when the mood calls. 

Maybe you're not feeling at your absolute best and need a pep talk. 

I did not give you permission to quit!

That one's for you sister.

Maybe you're just receptive to a fleeting moment of sheer joy with a proper sing-along, no matter if it ends on a bum note.

Neon got me like!


You're an hero among a sea of the unsung.

Karma's gonna get you Captain.

Over and out.